Monday, August 21, 2017

Make it Happen Monday


Some people dream of success, while other people get up every morning and make it happen. Wayne Huizenga
Today is Monday. The day of the week that everyone uses to make a new start. Choose today to make something happen!
  Make it Happen Monday - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorder/disease

I'm choosing to make my body in the body I have always wanted. It's taking me 52 years to do it, but better late than never! I'm starting to do a new exercise routine of the Supreme 90 Day challenge and my Walk Away the Pounds Miracle Miles.
  Leslie Sansones - Miracle Miles - brendamueller.com

I walk Miracle Miles everyday, but I am pumping up the muscle with the Supreme 90 Day strength training. I'm starting my workout with one Miracle Mile and then switching to the supreme workout and finishing with one or two more Miracle Miles. The walks are great for warming up before and cooling down after the supreme workout.
  Supreme 90 Day System - brendamueller.com

I have used the supreme system a few years ago and it really worked. Now that I'm feeling so much better since I switched my diet to "The Starch Solution" by Dr. McDougall I'm looking forward to the workouts. I have so much energy that I feel lazy if I don't exercise.
  She believed she could so she did - brendamueller.com

Now it is your turn. What is something that you are going to make happen starting today? Please leave your comment below and I will cheer you on in your endeavor!  

Saturday, August 12, 2017

August is Psoriasis Awareness Month



In a recent post I discussed autoimmune disorders that affect the skin. I have heard the word psoriasis for many years, but I don’t know anything about it except that it affects the skin. I want to learn more about the five types of psoriasis, so I'm sharing the information I have found with you. First let's take a look at the financial burden psoriasis has on the individual and the nation.

The Economic Impact of Psoriasis - August is Psoriasis Awareness Month - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorders/diseasesPsoriasis Stats

More than 3 million US cases per year

A new study on the economic burden of psoriasis found that the estimated annual expenses of psoriasis can be as high as $25,796 per person—or $135 billion for everyone with psoriasis in the United States.

Direct costs came with the highest price tag, which researchers estimated could be upwards of $8,000 annually per person.

Indirect costs, which take into account absences from work, or lost productivity on the job, due to psoriasis, were estimated to be upwards of $4,000 per person annually—or as much as $35.4 billion for the nation as a whole, according to the findings.

Researchers tallied intangible costs—which measure the toll that psoriasis takes on a patient’s quality of life—by looking at studies that asked patients what they would be willing to pay for relief from their disease.

Over the course of a lifetime, patients would pay up to $11,498 to be rid of the physical discomfort and negative emotional impact of psoriasis, researchers reported.

5 Types of Psoriasis - August is Psoriasis Awareness Month - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorders/diseasesPsoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disorder that manifests as skin redness and irritation. There are five different types of psoriasis: guttate, plaque, inverse, erythrodermic, and pustular. The most common is plaque psoriasis, in which raised, red skin patches are covered by flaky, silver-white patches of dead skin, known as scales. The autoimmune disease most strongly associated with psoriasis was rheumatoid arthritis (RA). If you have psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, your risk for an additional autoimmune disease increases even more.  

Guttate

Guttate psoriasis is a type of psoriasis that shows up on your skin as red, scaly, small, teardrop-shaped spots. It doesn’t normally leave a scar. You usually get it as a child or young adult. Up to 10% of people with psoriasis have this type. Guttate psoriasis causes small, pink-red spots on your skin. They often appear on your:
  • Trunk
  • Upper arms
  • Thighs
  • Scalp
Guttate psoriasis often comes on quite suddenly. There are a variety of known triggers, including:
  • Upper respiratory infections
  • Streptococcal infections
  • Tonsillitis
  • Stress
  • Injury to the skin
  • Certain drugs (including antimalarials and beta blockers)

Plaque Psoriasis

Plaque psoriasis causes raised, inflamed, red skin covered with silvery, white scales. These patches may itch and burn. It can appear anywhere on your body, but often pops up in these areas:
  • Elbows
  • Knees
  • Scalp
  • Lower back

Inverse Psoriasis

This type shows up as areas that are bright red, smooth, and shiny, but don't have scales. It's usually found in these locations:
  • Armpits
  • Groin
  • Under thebreasts
  • Skin folds around the genitals and buttocks
Inverse psoriasis may worsen with sweating and rubbing. A buildup of yeast may trigger it.

Pustular Psoriasis

This kind of psoriasis is uncommon and mostly appears in adults. It causes pus-filled bumps (pustules) surrounded by red skin. These may look infectious, but are not. This type may show up on one area of your body, such as the hands and feet. Sometimes it covers most of your body, which is called "generalized" pustular psoriasis. When this happens it can be very serious, so get immediate medical attention.

Triggers

  • Internal medications
  • Irritating topical agents
  • Overexposure to UV light
  • Pregnancy
  • Systemic steroids
  • Infections
  • Emotional stress
  • Sudden withdrawal of systemic medications or potent topical steroids

Erythrodermic Psoriasis

Erythrodermic psoriasis "throws off" the body's chemistry. This causes protein and fluid loss that can lead to severe illness. Edema (swelling from fluid retention), especially around the ankles, may develop, along with infection. The body may not be able to maintain its temperature. This can produce shivering episodes. Erythrodermic psoriasis also can bring on pneumonia and congestive heart failure. People with severe cases often require hospitalization. Erythrodermic psoriasis can occur abruptly at the first signs of psoriasis or it can come on gradually in people with plaque psoriasis. The reason erythrodermic psoriasis appears is not understood. However, there are some known triggers. This type is the least common, but it's very serious. It affects most of your body and causes widespread, fiery skin that appears burned. You might also have:
  • Severe itching, burning, or peeling
  • A faster heart rate
  • Changes in body temperature

Triggers

  • Abrupt withdrawal of systemic treatment
  • Severe sunburn
  • Allergic, drug-induced rash that brings on the Koebner phenomenon (a tendency for psoriasis to appear on the site of skin injuries)
  • Use of systemic steroids (cortisone)
  • Infection
  • Emotional stress
  • Alcoholism
If you have these symptoms, see your doctor right away. You may need to get treated in a hospital. This type of psoriasis can cause severe illness from protein and fluid loss. You may also develop an infection, pneumonia, or congestive heart failure. Psoriasis More than Just a Rash - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorders/diseases

Check out the top eight products on amazon.com for psoriasis. 

Action Step: It is great when we can all learn something new and help each other out, so if you have psoriasis and you have found a great remedy, please share it with us. Leave your comment below.           Source:
 

Thursday, August 10, 2017

"No Vacancy" for Negative Thoughts

How many times during the day do we let thoughts of negativity come into our mind? Once, twice, three times? Staying positive is something that we all need to work on. Some of us have a great outlook on life and everything is coming up roses. There are others who are like Glum from Gulliver's Travels where everything that can go wrong will go wrong. Picture your mind like it is a hotel. All of the rooms are filled with negative thoughts. By all the rooms being occupied with negativity there is no vacancy for any good and positive thoughts. I think we need to fill our hotel with all positive thoughts. Then we have no vacancy for the negative.

Paul wrote in, Philippians 4:8 Brothers and sisters, continue to think about what is good and worthy of praise. Think about what is true and honorable and right and pure and beautiful and respected.   We can use negative words to describe how we are. We can say,
  • "I am sick."
  • "I am weak."
  • "I am exhausted."
  • "I can't do anything right."
  • "I'm not as talented as, Jane."
Use positive words to describe how you want to be! - brendamueller,com - autoimmune disorders/diseases

How different we could be if we started using positive words to describe how we want to be! What if we said,
  • "I am conquering my illness; I am defeating it steadily each day.
  • "Today, I am brimming with energy and overflowing with joy."
  • "I wake up today with strength in my heart and clarity in my mind."
  • "I have been given endless talents which I begin to utilize today."
  • "I possess the qualities needed to be extremely successful."
So clear out those visitors in your hotel of negativity and make way for the new occupants of positive thought!

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-carmen-harra/affirmations_b_3527028.html

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

5 Reason You Should be Eating Potatoes

I Love a Potato!

I have fallen in love with the potato! I don't know how many years it has been that I have been avoiding thing wonderful starch, but I'm glad I have changed and added it back into my diet. I have been eating at least two potatoes everyday for the last four weeks. Guess what? I haven't gained any weight. I thought for sure that I would because in the past I have, but not any more. Today I want to learn more about these tasty spuds and see why they are so good for us.
  Fun Facts about Potatoes - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorders/diseases

Potatoes are...

– An excellent source of vitamin C – A good source of potassium (more than a banana!) – A good source of vitamin B6 – Fat-, sodium- and cholesterol-free – Only 110 calories per serving

Sweet Potatoes vs. white potatoes

  • They are similar in their calorie content as well as the amount of fiber, protein and vitamin B6.
  • White potatoes pack the greater potassium punch (620 mg vs 440 mg) whereas sweet potatoes definitely lead the way in vitamin A (120% of the daily value).
  • Both potatoes provide an excellent source of vitamin C (45% of the daily value for white potatoes and 30% of the daily value for sweet potatoes).

5 Benefits of Eating Potatoes

5 Benefits of Eating Potatoes - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorders/diseases

Reduce Inflammation I have found that a lot of my inflammation has subsided since I've been eating potatoes. I also am not having the constant pain of indigestion. Both rice and potatoes are very soothing to my digestive tract. This may be one of the reasons. Potatoes are very effective in reducing inflammation, both internal and external. Since it is soft, easily digested and has a lot of vitamin-C (a very good antioxidant that repairs tissue wear and tear), potassium and vitamin-B6, it can relieve any inflammation of the intestines and the digestive system.

Increase Immunity Vitamin C can help prevent everything from scurvy to the common cold, and potatoes are full of this nutrient, with about 45 percent of the daily recommended intake per medium baked potato, according to the Washington State Potato Commission. Potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin C (45% of the DV), which is more vitamin C than one medium tomato (40% DV) or sweet potato (30% DV).

Vitamin C aids in:
  • collagen production
  • assists with iron absorption
  • and helps heal wounds and keep your gums healthy
  • may help support the body’s immune system.

Maintain blood pressure Bananas are often suggested when people need to maintain their blood pressure because of their potassium. But did you know that while a banana has nine percent of your daily needs, a baked regular potato has twice as much-20 percent-and a sweet one has 12 percent.

Improve Gut Health A single baked potato will provide nearly 12% of the daily recommended amount of fiber. High levels of dietary fiber and 'bulking agents' support healthy digestion and regular bowel movements, while giving a protective effect from colon cancer. If you suffer from slow bowel movements, eat cooked potatoes that have been cooled. The cooling process increases the amount of indigestible starch from 7% to 13%. I have found that for me, eating the potatoes cause regular elimination. Potatoes are much tastier than a magnesium tablet.

Reduce Your Stress Potatoes are exceedingly rich in Vitamin B6, a vitamin needed for a balanced mood. Just  1/2 a cup of a baked potato contains 21 per cent of the daily value of the vitamin. Vitamin B6 is needed for normal brain development and function, and helps the body make the hormones serotonin and norepinephrine, which influence mood, and melatonin, which helps regulate the body clock.

Baked Russet Potato 4 Oz

Calories 110 Sodium 9 mg
Total Fat 0 g Potassium 624 mg
Saturated 0 g Total Carbs 24 g
Polyunsaturated 0 g Dietary Fiber 3 g
Monounsaturated 0 g Sugars 1 g
Trans 0 g Protein 3 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Vitamin A 0% Calcium 2%
Vitamin C 24% Iron 7%

The Baby Reds 1 Cup

Calories 110 Sodium 0 mg
Total Fat 0 g Potassium 620 mg
Saturated 0 g Total Carbs 26 g
Polyunsaturated 0 g Dietary Fiber 2 g
Monounsaturated 0 g Sugars 1 g
Trans 0 g Protein 3 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Vitamin A 0% Calcium 2%
Vitamin C 45% Iron 6%

The Yukon Golds 1/2 Medium Potato

Calories 77 Sodium 6 mg
Total Fat 0 g Potassium 421 mg
Saturated 0 g Total Carbs 25 g
Polyunsaturated 0 g Dietary Fiber 2 g
Monounsaturated 0 g Sugars 1 g
Trans 0 g Protein 2 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Vitamin A 0% Calcium 1%
Vitamin C 26% Iron 4%

The Yam 6 oz

Calories 150 Sodium 230 mg
Total Fat 2 g Potassium 0 mg
Saturated 1 g Total Carbs 30 g
Polyunsaturated 1 g Dietary Fiber 2 g
Monounsaturated 0 g Sugars 4 g
Trans 0 g Protein 5 g
Cholesterol 0 mg
Vitamin A 0% Calcium 25%
Vitamin C 0% Iron 10%
Percentages are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Source:

  • https://www.potatogoodness.com/nutrition/
  • http://www.myfitnesspal.com/food/calories/
  • https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/vegetable/health-benefits-of-potato.html
  • https://www.livescience.com/45838-potato-nutrition.html
  • http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-eats/healthy-eating/6-health-benefits-of-potatoes/
  • http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1206765/Why-potatoes-suprising-health-benefit-key-lasting-weight-loss.html

Saturday, July 29, 2017

Lupus and the Heart



I learned a lot preparing for this post. I have been writing about how autoimmune disorders affect different parts of the body, but I didn't realize how lupus affects the heart. Most of know by now that heart disease can be linked with a diet high in processed foods, sugars and refined carbohydrates, lack of activity, and obesity. This is good news! With proper diet and exercise those who make the effort can make this bad situation better or reverse their condition. When an autoimmune reaction is part of the heart disease picture, the approach is more complicated. If the autoimmunity has destroyed enough tissue, it can be too late to reverse the condition and its symptoms. More and more people are being diagnosed with autoimmune disorders, so it is to be hoped that more doctors will screen for autoimmunity so an autoimmune heart condition can be caught in time to manage it.

What is heart autoimmunity?

The symptoms of an autoimmune reaction against the heart mimic heart disease symptoms. They include:
  • cardiomegaly (enlarged heart)
  • fluid retention
  • tiring easily
  • chest pain
  • breathlessness
  • palpitations
  • edema with exercise
  • and difficulty breathing.
An unmanaged autoimmune reaction to the heart can cause inflammation, scarring, and, in rare cases, sudden death. Also, poor heart function affects the lungs, liver, and other organs and systems in the body. Did you know that doctors in the standard health care model do not screen for autoimmunity until the end stages of disease when symptoms are severe. Fortunately, you can identify an autoimmune reaction before it's too late with a blood serum antibody panel.

What is a blood serum antibody panel?

This panel screens for autoimmunity against heart tissue by checking for myocardial (a protein the heart releases in response to stress) or alpha-myosin (cardiac tissue) antibodies. If these come back positive it's an indication the immune system is attacking heart tissue. If the condition is more advanced, you may be given a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy, or disease of the heart muscle. Be in control. If you know you have an autoimmune condition, share this with your doctor right away. You can take the steps to potentially slow or halt its progression through proven diet, lifestyle, and nutritional therapy strategies. You should also regularly monitor your heart health. 4 Ways Lupus can Affect Your Heart - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorders/diseases Lupus Lupus can cause inflammation of the myocardium, the muscle tissue of your heart. The symptoms are:
  • chest pain
  • an unexplained rapid or irregular heart beat
  • shortness of breath
Myocarditis is often seen when there is inflammation in other muscles in the body.
Myocarditis is usually caused by a viral infection. A severe case can weaken the heart, which can lead to heart failure, abnormal heartbeat, and sudden death.
Symptoms include chest pain, abnormal heartbeat, and shortness of breath.
Treatment may include medication to regulate the heartbeat and improve heart function. In rare but severe cases, a device may be needed to help the heart function.
However, myocarditis can be caused by viral, bacterial, and fungal infections. Because lupus itself creates an added risk for developing infections -- especially if you are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs -- you are at increased risk for this type of myocarditis.
Immunosuppressive drugs or immunosuppressive agents or antirejection medications are drugs that inhibit or prevent activity of the immune system.
Though serious heart muscle disease is not commonly caused by lupus, heart failure can occur if our heart does not have the strength to pump enough blood to the different tissues and organs. The most common way that lupus affects the heart is through inflammation of the pericardium, the sac that surrounds our heart. The symptoms of pericarditis that you may experience are:
  • sharp pain in your chest
  • occasionally, shortness of breath.
Pericarditis usually does not damage our heart’s ability to function because it does not directly involve the heart tissue. However, inflammation that is chronic (long-lasting) can scar the heart tissue, which can interfere with the heart’s ability to pump blood.
Pericarditis may be caused by a viral infection or heart attack. In many cases, the cause is unknown.
The most common symptom is sharp, stabbing chest pain that may travel to the left shoulder and neck. Pericarditis usually begins suddenly but doesn't last long.
Most cases are mild and usually improve on their own. Treatment for more severe cases may include medications and, rarely, surgery.

Endocarditis

The endocardium is the tissue that lines the inner walls of our heart and the valves that separate the heart’s different chambers. Lupus can cause inflammation of the endocardium. Lupus endocarditis usually causes the surfaces of the heart valve to thicken or develop wart-like growths (lesions). These lesions can become infected, a condition called bacterial endocarditis. A lesion also could break off and travel to the brain to form a blood clot. Both of these possibilities are potentially very dangerous.

Coronary Artery Disease

The usual cause is the buildup of plaque. This causes coronary arteries to narrow, limiting blood flow to the heart.
Coronary artery disease can range from no symptoms, to chest pain, to a heart attack.
Treatments include lifestyle changes, medications, angioplasty, and surgery.
When we have lupus, we are at increased risk for coronary artery disease. This is partly because those of us with lupus have more risk factors, which may include:
  • Hypertension from kidney disease or corticosteroid use
  • Elevated cholesterol levels from corticosteroid use
  • Type 2 diabetes from corticosteroid use
  • An inactive, sedentary lifestyle due to fatigue, joint problems, and/or muscle pain
However, even after taking these risk factors into account, those of us with lupus are more likely to develop atherosclerosis. We can help reduce our chances of heart attacks and other complications from coronary artery disease in several ways:
  • Control the risk factors
  • Control the lupus disease activity
  • Talking with our doctor about reducing or stopping corticosteroid use
A build up of cholesterol plaque in the walls of arteries causing obstruction of blood flow. Plaques may rupture causing acute occlusion of the artery by clot.
Atherosclerosis often has no symptoms until a plaque ruptures or the buildup is severe enough to block blood flow.
A healthy diet and exercise can help. Treatments include medications, procedures to open blocked arteries and surgery.
Lupus and the Heart - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorders/diseases Source: http://www.resources.lupus.org/entry/heart-and-circulation

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

8 Autoimmune Disorders That Affecting Multiple Organs including the Musculoskeletal System

8 autoimmune disorders affecting multiple organs including the musculoskeletal system - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorders/diseasesIn my previous post I talked about autoimmune disorders that affect the hair and skin. Many of the autoimmune disorders affect multiple organs and the musculoskeletal system. The musculoskeletal system provides form, support, stability, and movement to the body. It is made up of the bones of the skeleton, muscles, cartilage, tendons, ligaments, joints, and other connective tissue that supports and binds tissues and organs together. Some of these autoimmune disorders are new to me and I want to learn more about them.

AI disorders affecting multiple organs including the musculoskeletal system

  • Lupus affects connective tissue and can strike any organ system of the body. Symptoms include joint inflammation, fever, weight loss and a characteristic facial rash.
  • Scleroderma affects the skin and other structures, causing the formation of scar tissue. Features include thickening of the skin, skin ulcers and stiff joints. Swelling of the fingers, intermittent coolness and blue discoloration of the fingers, joints freezing in permanent (usually flexed) positions (contractures), and damage to the gastrointestinal system, lungs, heart, or kidneys may develop.
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis. Affects the joints. Symptoms include swollen and deformed joints. The eyes, lungs and heart may also be targeted.
  • Polymyositis is one of the inflammatory myopathies, a group of muscle diseases that involves inflammation of the muscles or associated tissues, such as the blood vessels that supply the muscles. Polymyositis usually does not affect most internal organs other than the throat and esophagus. However, the lungs and heart may be affected, causing abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), shortness of breath, and a cough.
  • Dermatomyositis Muscle weakness at the shoulders or hips.
  • Sjogren's Syndrome white blood cells can infiltrate and damage glands that secrete fluids, and sometimes other organs can be damaged. Sjögren's syndrome can dry out the mucous membranes lining the nose, throat, digestive tract, voice box (larynx), windpipe (trachea), airways of the lungs, vulva, and vagina. Dryness of the vulva and vagina can make sexual intercourse painful. Dryness of the trachea can cause cough. Nerve, lung, and other tissues may be damaged by the inflammation.
  • Relapsing Polychondritis is a rare disorder characterized by episodes of painful, destructive inflammation of the cartilage and other connective tissues in many organs. The ears or nose may become inflamed and tender. Other cartilage in the body can be damaged, leading to various symptoms, such as red or painful eyes, hoarseness, cough, difficulty breathing, rashes, and pain around the breastbone.
  • Eosinophilic Fasciitis  is a rare disorder in which the skin and tissue that lies beneath the skin become painfully inflamed and swollen and gradually harden in the arms and legs.

Populations Affected by AI Disorders affecting multiple organs including the musculoskeletal system

Populations affected by AI Disorders affecting multiple organs including the musculoskeletal system - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorders/diseases

Lupus According to the Lupus Foundation of America, approximately 1.5 million people in the U.S. have lupus. People of African, Asian, and Native American descent are more likely to develop lupus than are Caucasians. Although it can occur in both men and women, 90% of people diagnosed with the disease are women.

Sjogren's Syndrome More than 200,000 US cases per year of Sjogren’s Syndrome. Sjögren’s syndrome can affect people of either sex and of any age, but most cases occur in women. The average age for onset is late forties, but in rare cases, Sjögren’s syndrome is diagnosed in children.

Rheumatoid arthritis About 1.5 million people in the United States have rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nearly three times as many women have the disease as men. In women, RA most commonly begins between ages 30 and 60. In men, it often occurs later in life.

Scleroderma The systemic form of scleroderma is thought to affect from 40,000 to 165,000 people in the United States. The disease is three to four times more common in females than in males. Scleroderma may occur at any age but the symptoms most frequently begin during midlife.

Dermatomyositis occurs in adults from the late 40s to early 60s, but can also occur in children. Females are most affected. Fewer than 200,000 US cases per year

Polymyositis (PM) is rare. Incidence is estimated to be somewhere between 1-8 cases per million people. Women are twice more likely to be affected than men. PM typically occurs during middle age and is rarely seen in people younger than 30 years.

Relapsing polychondritis occurs as often in men as in women. In a Mayo Clinic series, the annual incidence was about 3.5 cases per million.

Source: http://www.merckmanuals.com

Sunday, July 16, 2017

7 Autoimmune Disorders that Affect the Digestive Tract


Give me good digestion, Lord, And also something to digest; but where and how that something comes I leave to Thee, who knoweth best.                                                      Mary Webb
I hate it when any part of my digestive system isn't working properly. With Sjogren's I don't have saliva, so I have to drink large amounts of water with every bite. Sometimes I will drink two quarts of water just to make it through breakfast.

This also causes problems with swallowing. I will get food caught in my esophagus and it will try to come back up. The pain is excruciating when this happens. My chest, back, jaw, head hurt from the pain. I had to be hospitalized for a day. That was the most expensive piece of chicken I have ever eaten.

After I eat, sometimes my stomach will hurt because I had to drink so much water with my meal.
Enough about me. Let's look at the digestive system and the autoimmune disorders that affect the digestive track.
7 Autoimmune Disorders that Affect the Digestive Tract - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorders/diseases

The major parts of the digestive system:

  • Salivary glands.
  • Pharynx.
  • Esophagus.
  • Stomach.
  • Small Intestine.
  • Large Intestine.
  • Rectum.
  • Accessory digestive organs: liver, gallbladder, pancreas.
Parts of the Digestive Tract - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorders/diseases

7 Autoimmune Disorders that Affect the Digestive Tract

7 Autoimmune Disorders that Affect the Digestive Tract - brendamueller.com - autoimmune disorders/diseases

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus The digestive system is responsible for extracting nutrients from the food you eat and ridding your body of waste products. Lupus can affect the entire digestive system, beginning with the mouth. People with lupus are prone to lesions on the inside of the cheeks, the lower lip, or the roof of the mouth. Certain medications prescribed to treat lupus can increase your risk for oral lesions. When the esophagus is inflamed, stomach acid can be forced back into the esophagus (acid reflux), causing heartburn and gas. It can also make swallowing difficult (dysphagia). 

Some people with lupus take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This can increase risk of bleeding ulcers in the stomach lining or where the stomach meets the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and small intestine (duodenum). Helicobacter pylori bacterium also can cause ulcers, a common problem for people with lupus. 

Inflammation can cause fluids to build up in the lining on the inside of the abdomen (peritoneum). Symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, fever, and constipation. Lupus patients are at increased risk for inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Use of diuretics, immunosuppressants, or corticosteroids increases this risk. Digestive symptoms include constipation, diarrhea, and nausea. These problems can be aggravated by the use of corticosteroids or NSAIDs. Ulcers that form in the colon and rectum may cause bloody diarrhea. 

Polyarteritis Nodosa PAN is a multisystem disease that may present with fever, sweats, weight loss, and severe muscle and joint aches/pains. The disease can affect nearly any site in the body, but it has a predisposition for organs such as the skin, kidney, nerves, and gastrointestinal tract. 

Celiac disease Affects about 1 person in 200, occurs when a person becomes intolerant to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley products. In people with celiac disease, the ingestion of gluten causes the immune system to attack villi, the tiny structures lining the small intestine. 

Crohn's Disease This condition occurs when the immune system attacks parts of the digestive tract, causing inflammation, swelling, and even scarring. 

Ulcerative Colitis the "cousin" of Crohn's disease, and explains that it happens when the immune system attacks the lining of the rectum and colon, causing ulcers. The ulcers can then bleed and produce pus. 

Autoimmune Hepatitis Unlike most types of hepatitis, which are caused by viruses, autoimmune hepatitis happens when the body's immune system attacks liver cells, causing inflammation. 

Diabetes The partial paralysis of the stomach, which causes delayed gastric emptying. This delayed emptying is most often associated with poorly controlled diabetes.   

Source: